Honda Jazz Facelift Review & Performance

Honda Jazz Overview

Honda Siel Cars India is ready to roll its small car into India. The new hatchback model will be called Honda Jazz. It is the only small car model from Honda’s global portfolio in India and it will directly compete with Hyundai Getz and Maruti Swift in India. One of the biggest auto car magazines, Top Gear, has rated Jazz as the number one global hatchback model and Maruti Swift as Number 3.Honda has been toying with the idea of launching its small car model in India, which is the largest small car market in the world. Now the company looks serious to put its plans into action by introducing Jazz or Fit as it is called in some of the overseas markets. The company has also been encouraged by the lower excise duty on the small cars in the country and has finally decided to introduce its small cars which sports trendy looks and packs plenty of power. For information on contact details of Honda car dealers in Mumbai

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Honda Jazz Look

The Honda Jazz has a strong design identity of its own and thus all three generations of this hatchback show an evolutionary direction. One might be tempted to call this car a compact MPV as certain angles does make it look like a shrunk down MPV. There are certainly some nice design elements which make the Jazz look premium like the headlights which are similar to the City (they are single barrel while the City gets dual barrel), they merge into the grille that gets a piano black finishing and a chrome line below. Honda’s angular design does make the Jazz look attractive at the front while at the side, the Jazz come across as big which is largely due to the glass area, the vehicle getting both front and rear quarter-glass for added green house.

The B and C pillars are blackened which will certainly look good on light colours like white while a strong belt line runs from the door, merging with the rear tail light at the top and flowing through the rear bumper on the bottom. The tyres look small on the car and bigger wheels (at least on the top spec trims) would have made the car look more balanced. The rear is nicely done with reflectors right next to the windscreen while a large chrome bar is right below, featuring the Honda logo. The reflector and rear LED tail lights together make the rear portion look a bit like the Volvo V40. There is also a rear spoiler (the VX trim gets a bigger one) with stop lamp while the bumper has a black rectangle mesh finish on either side to reduce the visual bulk. Just like all other Hondas, the design of the Jazz isn’t outright exciting or eye catchy but it does have subtle appeal.

Honda Jazz Comfort

The Jazz shares the dashboard with the City and it has a really funky design with a flurry of asymmetric cues. It is well thought-out, with nice touches, including multiple cubby-holes and the touch controls for the air-con. There are as many as nine cupholders and quite a few cubbyholes too, so you won’t find yourself short on storage spaces for small items. Quality is quite decent, but it still can’t match the Hyundai as far as fit and finish is concerned. Also, overall plastic quality, though largely good, is still a notch down on the class best.The top-of-the-line Jazz comes with an all-black cabin which looks quite sporty. Apart from the top VX, all other variants get beige fabric, which makes the cabin feel even more airy, but gets soiled easily.

Like the old car, the brilliance of the Jazz lies in its unbelievable space efficiency. Entry into the massive cabin is made easy by large doors which open wide. Outward visibility is good, thanks to the generous glass area, but the front quarter-windows near the slim A-pillars obstruct view. The front seats have a tall seating position and are pretty broad with generous bolstering, comfortable over long journeys. In the rear, the seat squab is a touch short, so under-thigh support is not as good as we would have liked. Other than that, it’s hard to fault the back seat. The adjustable back rest, terrific head and legroom, plus generous width, make the Jazz’s bench comfortable. The flexible manner in which the rear seats function is also outstanding. But unlike the old car, only top-spec Jazz models will get the ‘magic seats’ at the back. These seats split, fold flat and flip upwards to make space for all shapes and sizes of cargo – that’s if the massive 354-litre boot won’t meet your needs anyway. These seats now also allow you to form a recliner by pushing the front seat backrests fully till they meet the rear seat base.

The top Jazz VX trim comes equipped with a 6.2-inch touchscreen infotainment system. There’s also satellite navigation, a reclining back seat, automatic climate control with feather-touch operation, steering-mounted audio and Bluetooth controls, height adjustable driver’s seat, a rake and reach adjustable steering wheel and auto folding rear-view mirrors. On the safety front, it comes equipped with two airbags and ABS with EBD. Surprisingly, although it gets a reversing camera, there are no parking sensors.

Honda Jazz Performance

Under the stubby hood of the Jazz one can find either the popular 1.2-litre i-VTEC petrol or the relatively new 1.5-litre i-DTEC diesel motor. While the former is available with either a 5-speed manual or a CVT automatic, the diesel car gets a 6-speed manual similar to that of the new City. Starting with the petrol motor, this 1.2-litre unit is a familiar unit, previously seen in a range of Honda models including the Brio, the Amaze and even the old Jazz. Known for its refined nature and strong mid-range grunt, it produces 90bhp of power and 110Nm of torque, and in the new Jazz it retains those characteristics. During our stint behind the wheel, the petrol-powered Jazz felt fairly satisfying (if not thrilling) to drive, although I was bound to rev its absolute nuts off to make quick progress. Interestingly, the same engine in the Brio feels much stronger thanks to the car’s significantly less kerb weight. As for the gearbox, the 5-speed manual is also a familiar unit and like before, is a treat to go through the gears. Going by the spike in demand for diesel cars, it’s the diesel-powered Jazz that, in all probability, will be Honda’s new big seller; powered by a 1.5-litre i-DTEC four cylinder motor, the diesel Jazz pushes out 100bhp of power and a meaty 200Nm of torque – familiar numbers for Amaze and City users. It’s the same unit which has received a lot of blow from the users for its harshness and keeping that in mind, Honda says it has invested in additional noise and vibration absorption techniques to reduce NVH levels. So has it worked? Yes, to an extent. However, it is still not as refined as say a diesel Hyundai Elite i20 and the diesel clatter is evident nearly all the time. Honda, though, fights back with a stronger midrange and a comparatively linear power delivery than most vehicles in its class including the VW Polo GT TDI and the Elite i20.

As far as fuel efficiency goes, Honda is claiming up to 27.3 kmpl for the diesel Jazz, making it one of the most fuel efficient hatchbacks on sale today. However, we couldn’t better 16kmpl during our stint with the car, although it was mainly down to our heavy right foot and the fact that our test route included a lot of negotiating through traffic. The impressive figure, no doubt, was aided by the smooth shifting 6-speed manual gearbox which uses a slightly different set of ratios compared to the City.

Honda Jazz Rideing

So how is the Jazz to drive? It’s as light and agile as you’d expect from a Honda hatch. Ride quality is excellent at slow and medium speeds. We haven’t got the chance to test its stability at high speeds due to the narrow roads of Goa but we did get to test the tyres. These are designed keeping efficiency in mind and so don’t offer the levels of grip we would have liked. The electric steering is light and offers no feedback, which is expected, but it weighs up well and is direct. The Jazz turns in well into corners and stays composed till the tyres reach their grip limits.cellent view of the surroundings, especially while parking the car. Coupled with the rear camera, the Jazz can be slot in tight spaces. The quality of the display screen however could have been better, especially in sharp sunlight.

Honda Jazz Safety

Disc brakes at the front and drum brakes at the rear have been fitted to provide the stopping power. Anti-lock braking system, along with electronic brake force distribution, has been set up in the Jazz S CVT and diesel trims only. Dual front airbags are available in the SV trim and the others placed above it. Among the secondary safety features, central locking, driver seat belt and key reminder have also been put in place to perform their respective duties.

Honda Jazz Price in Hyderabad

Honda Jazz Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 7,50,515/- (Jazz V MT Petrol) to 9,29,572/- (Jazz VX MT Diesel). Get best offers for Honda Jazz from Honda Dealers in Hyderabad. Check for Jazz price in Hyderabad at Crazprice

Honda Jazz Bottomline

If space and versatility are paramount, there is quite simply no better option than the Jazz. Helping the Jazz’s case this time around is the fact that it can be had with a diesel engine and even in petrol automatic form meaning there’s a version of the car for every type of hatchback buyer. In every form, the Jazz comes across as a car that’s comfortable and well suited to the requirements of day-to-day city driving. It’s not exciting per se, but that’s unlikely to impact an average buyer’s decision. What will, is the price.The good news is that, save for the top-spec VX versions available on the petrol manual and diesel cars, the rest of the Jazz range is competitively priced. So, in its latest form, the Jazz has the ingredients to become the hit it always deserved to be

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